• Wed. Feb 28th, 2024

2023 Superflex Rookie Mock Draft 1.0

By Dynasty Pros Staff

 

Every fantasy football site/podcast/YouTube channel does a Rookie Mock Draft.  My advice when looking at all of the mocks… soak in the player info and then make a composite of all of the mocks you look at, then form your own plan based on how your team is already constructed.  Here at DynastyProsFootball, we had six of our writers do a four-round Rookie Mock Draft (SuperFlex, Full PPR) making two selections per round.  

 

 

1.01 RB Bijan Robinson, 6'0 215 lbs, Texas

This may be chalky, but it is for a reason.  Robinson is the best fantasy football prospect in this class. There is nothing I’m going to say here that you haven’t heard about Robinson, so I will answer the bigger question: what if I’m rebuilding and don’t want to take a running back yet? I would still take Robinson over the quarterbacks here even in a SuperFlex league, but more importantly, I would try to trade back. You can potentially get a massive haul for him right now. If you cannot make that happen I would just take Bijan. Hopefully, I can complete my rebuild in time for him to be of use to me or I can try to flip him in the season when he is starting to produce. 

- Doug Harrelson (@DougHarrelson)

 

1.02 QB Bryce Young, 6’0 194lbs, Alabama

Alabama has had success at quarterback lately and it continues with Young.  When it comes to the first quarterback off the board, there are two players who are battling.  And although I prefer CJ Stroud, it’s hard to ignore that Young has had more success when it mattered most.  Ultimately, you can’t go wrong with either pick, but for me, it comes down to Young’s Heisman, better rushing ability and doing more with less on his team.  Give me Young with the slightest of advantages over Stroud.

- Tim Lazenby (@mrLazenby_)

 

1.03 C. J. Stroud, QB, 6’3” 215lbs, Ohio State

Arguably the best pure passer in this class, Stroud seemingly came from nowhere, going straight from Justin Fields’ backup to two-time Heisman Trophy contender. He has prototype size, can make all the throws, and can put the ball in almost unimaginably precise spots for his receivers. He’s proven he can perform on the biggest stages with spectacular bowl performances against the elite defenses of Utah and Georgia. The only question left to answer is whether he can be elite without an elite supporting cast.

- Joel Wirth (@TheJoelWirth)

 

1.04 RB Jahmyr Gibbs, 5’11 200lbs, Alabama

Gibbs has been compared to Alvin Kamara, and that is a very fair comp.  Kamara is a little thicker, but they have very similar playing styles and skill sets.  I would give Gibbs the edge when it comes to breakaway speed, so give me that at 1.04 in any rookie draft.

- Tommy Havey (@DynastyProsTom)

 

1.05 WR Quentin Johnston, 6'4 215 lbs, TCU

Wow.. I did not expect to get Johnston here, but I’m glad I did. The first 3 picks were chalk, and I really expected Quentin Johnston to go at 1.04. With that being said I was really debating on whether I’d go Jahmyr Gibbs or Jaxon Smith-Njigba at the 1.05 spot. I see Johnston as the best WR in this class, and he should be drafted as a team’s go-to WR1. He’s my overall 1.04 in Superflex Rookie Drafts. 

- Bob Miller (@DynastyBobFF)

 

1.06 WR Jaxon Smith-Njigba, 6'0 193 lbs, Ohio St

Smith-Njigba follows the Ohio St. wide receiver pipeline to the NFL behind Garret Willson and Chris Olave. Smith-Njigba isn’t just “twitchy-fast,” he has long, breakaway speed. And, with him learning behind Olave and Wilson, Jaxon is a solid route runner who knows how to find open spaces in a defense.  If he was 2 inches taller, he may have garnered top 5 buzz in the 2023 NFL draft.  Wherever he is drafted, he is an immediate contributor with his ability to take the top off of defenses and his ability to create space over the middle. Yes, there may be some injury concern with Smith-Njigba missing most of the 2022 season, but all indications are his hamstring is not a long-term issue. There may be other receivers with more “singular” attributes that make them more appealing (Quentin Johnson? Or Jordan Addison?), but for the total package, Jaxon Smith-Njigba is the #1 receiver on my rookie board and I’m happy to grab him at 1.05.

- Goody (@JGoody77)

 

1.07 TE Michael Mayer, 6'4 250 lbs, Notre Dame

When researching Michael Mayer, the following terms were used to describe Mayer: “well-rounded,” “polished,” “natural instincts,” and “physical.”  In short, Michael Mayer could very well enter the league and already be a top 5 tight end before the end of his first year.  Some analysts believe that a tight end this high is a waste.  However, the position is so thin of elite tight ends (Kelce, Kittle, Andrews) that the chance to draft a player and have that position covered for the next 10 years is too great to pass up.  Some may ask: Is this going to be another Kyle Pitts situation?  My answer is, “NO!” I believe the media hyped Pitts with his acrobatic catches too much and didn’t take account of all the other characteristics that make a great tight end.  Mayer does all the little things right and all the big things great.  I believe Mayer will be the benchmark that all tight ends will be compared to for the next decade.

- Goody (@JGoody77)

 

1.08 WR Jordan Addison, 6'0 180 lbs, USC

Another surprise for me here. Goody went with Michael Mayer at 1.07, and Addison fell right into my lap. With fantasy managers so desperate for a productive TE, I understand why some could pull the trigger early on Mayer. Not me.. Give me a potential stud WR every time. Addison is my WR3 in rookie drafts, so I’m super excited to grab him with the 8th pick.

- Bob Miller (@DynastyBobFF)

 

1.09 WR Kayshon Boutte, 6’0 205 lbs, LSU

Boutte is possibly the most skilled WR in this draft class.  He is built like Ja’Marr Chase and runs with the same kind of grace and effortlessness.  I don’t believe he is quite as good as Chase, but he should be a quality WR in the NFL.  LSU has a good reputation for putting high caliber WRs in the league, and Boutte is the next in line.

- Tommy Havey (@DynastyProsTom)

 

1.10 QB Will Levis, 6’3” 232 lbs, Kentucky

The ultimate “profile over production” NFL prospect. Scouts have been drooling over Levis’ prototype QB body and arm for years. The problem is, he wasn’t a very good college quarterback. If you watch his highlights, you’ll walk away thinking he’s a superstar in the making. If you watch his tape, you’ll weep over his inconsistency and inability to transcend his situation. He makes everything look easy, from the sublime throws to the ridiculous interceptions. If (capital letters, bold type if) he can improve his mechanics and decision making, we’ll see that superstar come out and dominate for years to come. If he can’t, there will be a lot of damning comparisons to failed QB prospects of the past.

- Joel Wirth (@TheJoelWirth)

 

1.11  RB Zach Evans, 6’0 215 lbs, Ole Miss

While Zach Evans lacks the pass catching prowess that many look for in a running back in the NFL, it’s hard to ignore his premier rushing ability.  Sure, the pass blocking needs work, but many running backs struggle with that straight out of the gate in the NFL.  His burst and fantastic 40 time show that he can be trusted with early downs to gain critical yards.  Lastly, it’s true that he’s not the best running back in the class, but he’s being overlooked.  

- Tim Lazenby (@mrLazenby_)

 

1.12 RB Tank Bigsby, 6'0 213 lbs, Auburn

Watching Bigsby tape is such a joy. The former track star shows off his ability to accelerate every time he sees an opening. The right landing spot could make the idea of landing him here at the back end of the first round purely a fantasy. While he was not used much in the passing game in college, his quickness and explosiveness tell me that given the right scheme, he could certainly be useful in the passing game at some point. Despite his quickness, breakaway speed is a small concern but there is a ton of upside with Bigsby. 

- Doug Harrelson (@DougHarrelson)

 

2.01 RB Zach Charbonnet, 6'1 222 lbs, UCLA

How I rank Bigsby and Charbonnet may flip-flop multiple times between now and when I am on the clock in my dynasty leagues. Charbonnet has a physicality to his game that is made for Sundays. He finishes runs strong and sheds arm tackles effortlessly. Charbonnet also has fantastic instincts and vision when he runs the ball. That part of the game will not be an adjustment for Charbonnet. Minor concerns about his pad level, I think he has gotten so used to effortlessly breaking tackles that it has caused him to run a little taller than he should. An issue very easily fixed by some coaching. He is also not likely to generate a ton of big plays at the next level but there have been many successful backs with that same issue.

- Doug Harrelson (@DougHarrelson)

 

2.02 QB Anthony Richardson, 6’4 232 lbs, Florida

I wanted Richardson at my earlier pick, but I was delighted to see he was still available.  It’s very true that Richardson is far from polished, but in fantasy football, he has the greatest ceiling of the class.  The raw talent can’t be drafted before Young, Stroud or even perhaps Levis, but there’s a chance he could rise above them in the right system.  Players like Fields and Hurts have shown that the best quarterback in the draft may not be the best in fantasy football.  I’m not saying he’s Josh Allen, but Allen’s cannon, combined with rushing ability made Cleveland look foolish for taking the safer pick in Baker Mayfield.

- Tim Lazenby (@mrLazenby_)

 

2.03 RB Sean Tucker, 5’10” 205 lbs, Syracuse

Sean Tucker is slightly smaller than the presumed ideal for an NFL running back. Outside of that, there’s not much to not like. He’s shown everything you want to see in a running back, vision, balance, acceleration, and long speed. He’s a good pass blocker, excellent receiver out of the backfield and is deadly in open space. He can run through you, he can run by you, and he can run away from you.

- Joel Wirth (@TheJoelWirth)

 

2.04 WR Josh Downs, 5’10 175 lbs, North Carolina

Downs will be a highly productive slot receiver in the NFL.  He is on the small side, but his elite speed will be a difference maker.  He runs good, crisp routes and should get open downfield plenty.  He does need to improve on his drop rate from his final season at North Carolina, but I absolutely love getting him in the middle of the 2nd round.  

- Tommy Havey (@DynastyProsTom)

 

2.05 RB Kendre Miller, 6'0 220 lbs, TCU 

Miller is a bonafide top 5 RB in this class. At 6’0″ and nearly 220 pounds, he is an explosive runner with agility, finesse, and balance both through contact and cuts. He also has great vision and processing speed, as well as superb creative instincts. On top of that, he provides value as a receiver and a blocker on passing downs. I could see him as this year’s Kenneth Walker. However, unlike Walker, you may get to steal this RB in the 2nd round of your rookie draft.

- Bob Miller (@DynastyBobFF)

 

2.06 WR Jalin Hyatt, 6'0 186 lbs, Tennessee

In short, Jalin had a DOMINANT senior season at Tennessee.  He hauled in 67 passes for over 1,200 yards and 15 touchdowns.  And those are not just “numbers,” as Hyatt picked up many awards in recognition of his amazing season.  Hyatt was named First Team All-America by essentially every publication that names a team and the Biletnikoff Award for college’s most outstanding receiver.  Did I also mention that Hyatt runs a 4.29 40-yard dash?  Yes, he has speed for days.  And with his size, Jalin’s catch radius is special and his route running is top notch. The one criticism of Hyatt’s is  his hands. He has had some drops in games, but it is not a problem that can’t be improved.   To grab a player in the 2nd round with this type of ability, may just win fantasy football leagues.

- Goody (@JGoody77)

 

2.07 TE Darnell Washington, 6'7 280 lbs, Georgia

If you looked at Washington’s stats from the 2022 college football season, you may wonder why he is even on draft radars, let alone fantasy football radars.  Well, the adage goes: You can’t teach height.  You also can’t teach size.  Washington is 6’7 and 280 lbs of human being.  With all that size, Darnell can also run.  His 4.63 40-yard dash puts him better than average for any tight end prospect; let alone one as big and as strong as him.

With his blocking ability, and short to intermediate pass catching ability, Washington will be a useful tool in fantasy football; especially at a position that lacks options.

- Goody (@JGoody77)

 

2.08 QB Hendon Hooker, 6'3 210 lbs, Tennessee 

This is a Superflex draft right? How in the heck did I luck out and get Hendon Hooker at 2.08? I actually have Hooker as my QB2 over the likes of Bryce Young, Anthony Richardson, and Will Levis. He’s a better NFL talent than Bryce Young, a much better arm talent than Anthony Richardson, and more big-game proven than Will Levis. Hooker is projected as a late 2nd or 3rd round pick, however, with Hooker’s rehab going ahead of schedule, I can’t see that projection lasting long. He could be a fantastic replacement to Lamar Jackson in Baltimore (if traded). Detroit or Seattle would also be a great landing spot for the dual-threat QB.

- Bob Miller (@DynastyBobFF)

 

2.09 WR Zay Flowers, 5’10 177 lbs, Boston College

Flowers is in the same mold as Josh Downs…whom I selected earlier in the 2nd round.  Playing at Boston College didn’t do him any favors.  If he had played in a higher profile program, I believe he would have been an ultra-producer in the slot.  His footwork and field vision have the potential to make him special.

- Tommy Havey (@DynastyProsTom)

 

2.10 RB Devon Achane, 5’9” 185 lbs, Texas A&M

Devon Achane’s size will likely prevent him from being a feature back in the NFL. Notice I said likely, not definitely. Achane has legit world class sprinter speed. When he destroys the combine, every offensive coordinator in the league is going to start licking their chops, imagining what he can do in their offense. It’s a cliche, but you can’t teach speed and Achane’s got four-leaf clover speed. He’ll be a weapon in the passing game, on jet sweeps, and could be a Pro Bowl kick returner, on top of being an elite, if carry-limited half back. You’ll see a lot of Darren Sproles comparisons for Devon Achane, I think it’s better to think of him as a smaller Chris Johnson.

- Joel Wirth (@TheJoelWirth)

 

2.11 WR Marvin Mims, 5’11 184 lbs, Oklahoma

Marvin Mims is one of those receivers who had success straight out of the gate in college.  A blemish on his chances in the draft is his smaller stature, but he plays bigger than his frame suggests.  He will not blow defenders away off the block, but he is fantastic at gaining momentum as he runs.  I do worry that teams will want to utilize his ability as a returner and ignore him as a receiver on normal downs, but if they don’t make that mistake he’s sure to be an incredible value in the draft.  I’m banking on the right situation uncorking his full abilities.

- Tim Lazenby (@mrLazenby_)

 

2.12 RB Tyjae Spears, 5'10 195 lbs, Tulane

I had not planned to be four picks into this draft and still just taking running backs but here we are. The position is deep in this class. Spears profiles as a 3rd down back and does so well in space. The way he sets up angles for the moves that he has in his bag is a work of art. His size means he will likely never be a 20-plus touch guy but in a complimentary role, he could excel in the right offense. 

- Doug Harrelson (@DougHarrelson)

 

3.01 TE Dalton Kincaid, 6'4 242 lbs, Utah

Stop me if you have heard this before, a former basketball player is playing tight end. A bit of a raw prospect but has excellent ball skills and some scary upside. Dalton Kincaid would be best suited to a team where he does not have to block a ton and can be used in a “big-slot” role in the early stages of his career. He will obviously have plenty of usage in the red zone with his skill set. He still has a long way to go as a blocker and might be a little smaller than we like at tight end but to get this upside in the third round has me thrilled.

- Doug Harrelson (@DougHarrelson)

 

3.02 RB Kenny McIntosh, 6’1 210 lbs, Georgia

While McIntosh isn’t the best runner in the class, his ability in the passing game has been admirable in college and it’s sure to earn him work on third downs.  I don’t think he’ll be a starting running back, but he has the potential to turn into one.  He has a knock against him in not being able to shrink between the tackles, but he’s elusive enough to work on making defenders miss.  Bottom line, when it comes to Georgia, you give trust to the system.  With the amount of elite runners they have produced in the NFL, I gamble on McIntosh’s chances.

- Tim Lazenby (@mrLazenby_)

 

3.03 WR Rashee Rice, 6’3” 205 lbs, SMU

The Analytics Bros will look at Rashee Rice’s profile, see a four-year senior with a late breakout and move on. The Tape Bros, on the other hand, are going to love what they see. A true boundary X receiver with the speed to run by defenders and the size and strong hands to go up over the top and pluck the ball away from them. Rice is by no means a finished product. SMU’s offense was very right-handed and he ran almost exclusively from the strong side and didn’t have the most extensive route tree, but give him some NFL coaching and the tools are there to build the next stud wide receiver.

- Joel Wirth (@TheJoelWirth)

 

3.04 WR Cedric Tillman, 6’3 216 lbs, Tennessee

Tillman has great 50/50 ball skills and is a very physical WR.  He is a very good blocker in the running game and in the screen game.  His ability to track the deep ball is borderline elite, but his lack of gamebreaking speed will cause issues in separation.  He sustained a serious ankle injury this past season and underwent surgery.  He will have to prove his durability at the next level.

- Tommy Havey (@DynastyProsTom)

 

3.05 RB Eric Gray, 5'10, 212 lbs, Oklahoma 

This is the point in the draft where I start grabbing RBs with the hopes of getting this year’s Dameon Pierce/Isiah Pecheco. I grabbed Gray here due to his tremendous potential. He is a violent runner with a rare blend of balance, agility, and instinct. He may be drafted as depth to start, but he could take over a backfield sooner than later. Dallas or Carolina would be a great spot for him to land. 

- Bob Miller (@DynastyBobFF)

 

3.06 WR Parker Washington, 5'11 215 lbs, Penn St

Parker Washington doesn’t excite scouts with his physical attributes; too short to make contested catches, too heavy to be a downfield burner.  Yet, Washington thrives at running over the middle and being an openfield terror. In many ways, the similarities between Washington and Deebo Samuel are starting to materialize in my eyes.  The statistics don’t jump off the page from Washington’s 2022 season at Penn St.  He recorded 46 catches for 611 yards and 2 td’s.  However, what makes Washington an intriguing NFL prospect is his ability to go over the middle to make tough grabs and create havoc in the open field.  At this point in the draft, the risk/reward was worth it.

- Goody (@JGoody77)

 

3.07 RB Chase Brown, 5'11 205 lbs, Illinois

Chase Brown has the perfect combination of size and speed to be relevant in the NFL.  Each year in college, Brown showed improvement in both his running and receiving.  During his 5th year, he ran for 1,632 yards with 10 touchdowns.  A concern some may have for Brown is a propensity for fumbling; he had 5 fumbles this past year. He will need to rectify that in order for Offensive Coordinators to trust him early in his career. His pass catching abilities are what teams may fall in love with during the draft, but he will be a valuable commodity as a dual threat back with the ability to create chunk plays frequently.

- Goody (@JGoody77)

 

3.08 RB Israel Abanikanda, 5'11 215 lbs, Pittsburgh 

Izzy Abanikanda may not be the most talented RB in the class, however he is a smart, patient runner who always picks up positive yards. He’s a north/south grinder that could really help a team like the LA Chargers or Arizona Cardinals. Again, I’m grabbing RBs at this point with the hopes of hitting on one. 

- Bob Miller (@DynastyBobFF)

 

3.09 RB Dwayne McBride, 5’11 215 lbs, Alabama-Birmingham

Super productive as a runner at UAB, McBride was not utilized in the passing game very often.  That is my main question with him.  He has good size and is very violent at the point of contact.  He also has decent, but not great speed.  I think the 3rd/4th round turn is a solid spot to draft him.  

- Tommy Havey (@DynastyProsTom)

 

3.10 QB Tanner McKee, 6’6”, 230 lbs, Stanford

For the past couple years, Stanford has, well, frankly, they’ve sucked. But if there was a reason to watch the Cardinal, it was Tanner McKee. At 6’6”, 230, you literally couldn’t miss him. If you watch him throw, you might think he has a literal whip for an arm, but it’s an actual human arm. An arm that can make throws all over the field. No one will confuse him for Lamar Jackson on the run, but he’s a good enough athlete to run when needed and can drop dimes on the move. He’ll need to tighten up his throwing motion, so he’s not going to be considered among the top tier of QBs in this draft, but for a team that needs a quarterback but doesn’t want to go the retread route and may not have the draft capital to take one of the elite, McKee is a worthy investment.

- Joel Wirth (@TheJoelWirth)

 

3.11 RB Deuce Vaughn, 5’6 176 lbs, Kansas State

Vaughn profiles to be a fantastic third down back, but one who will not carry the load as a starter.  A prototypical pass catching running back is very appealing in fantasy football.  Although he’s not one to run through the tackles due to his small stature, players like Darren Sproles, for example, show that you don’t need to be big to succeed.  It’s hard not to hear the word dynamic when speaking of Deuce Vaughn and he’s sure to be a steal in the draft.

- Tim Lazenby (@mrLazenby_)

 

3.12 WR Rakim Jarrett, 6'0 190 lbs, Maryland 

We have reached the stage of the draft where I am now looking for unique traits. None of the players left on the board are perfect prospects or they would have been gone a long time ago. Rakim Jarrett has one of the traits that can make it easier for him to get on the field sooner and that is the ability to run after the catch. NFL offenses love simple plays to get the ball in space in the hands of guys who know how to move with it. He is a bit undersized and I am not sure about him making contested catches or being a threat downfield but if he can find the right spot, he can produce. 

- Doug Harrelson (@DougHarrelson)

 

4.01 WR Nathanial Dell, 5'9 165 lbs, Houston

This could be a pick that is ultimately being lit on fire but this is what I want to be doing in the later rounds of rookie drafts. High-ceiling guys that could pop. Nathaniel Dell may be small but he has obscene amounts of quickness in that little body. Even if he does not possess all the skills of an NFL wide receiver, I imagine he will land a roster spot as a return man somewhere if nothing else. Being on the roster is half the battle then if he can get some run at wide receiver, perhaps he can flash there. His draft capital may change my thoughts if he goes undrafted. 

- Doug Harrelson (@DougHarrelson)

 

4.02 TE Sam LaPorta, 6’4 249 lbs, Iowa

LaPorta has been tagged as a player with few red flags, but also few show stopping qualities.  But just because you don’t blow analysts away, it doesn’t mean LaPorta isn’t enticing.  He’s already shown he can be placed all over in formation and his soft hands should give him a decent floor in the receiving game.  I do worry about his pass blocking abilities, which are key at the position, but he’s not the only college tight end that will need to work on it at the NFL level.  I identify him as a top five option at the position and worthy of selection late in rookie drafts.

- Tim Lazenby (@mrLazenby_)

 

4.03 WR A.T. Perry, 6’5”, 205 lbs, Wake Forest

A.T. Perry is a player whose draft stock will be heavily dependent on his combine showing. The tape shows a receiver who’s fast and can get open on a variety of routes. Is he elite fast? Is he really 6’5”? Is he really 205? I have my doubts about the last one, but we’ll see. I’d like to have seen him go to the Senior Bowl, as Wake’s offense, while productive, could get a bit gimmicky. If he can answer his pre-draft questions positively, he may be another Jordan Addison, at a more palatable price.

- Joel Wirth (@TheJoelWirth)

 

4.04 TE Zack Kuntz, 6’8 251 lbs, Old Dominion

Outside of Michael Mayer, Kuntz is probably my favorite TE.  He is definitely the most intriguing TE prospect IMO.  A massive target that also runs well, Kuntz has the potential to be a monster in the NFL.  He has great pass catching skills, but he will have to prove health and productivity at a much higher level than he competed in while at Old Dominion.  

- Tommy Havey (@DynastyProsTom)

 

4.05 RB Chris Rodriguez, 5'11 224 lbs, Kentucky 

Rodriguez is not an explosive runner, however he is a decisive runner with good feet and vision. He will be a backup for whoever drafts him, but he’s still worth grabbing due to potential injuries. He’s a dart throw here in the 4th round. 

- Bob Miller (@DynastyBobFF)

 

4.06 WR Puka Nacua, 6'2 205 lbs, BYU

Puka has all the physical traits to be a useful piece in NFL offenses.  Nacua has a history of making the most out of his limited touches in games.  In 2021, he averaged 18.3 yards per reception; in 2022, he averaged 13 yards per catch.  Nacua runs a limited route tree (as of now), but should progress as he develops as a receiver.  Puka, at times, can get too comfortable with using his body to make catches rather than his hands.  He will need to improve on that in order to be a weekly starter in fantasy football.  However, with his ability to track the deep pass, I see a lot of Gabe Davis in his game.

- Goody (@JGoody77)

 

4.07 QB Jaren Hall, 6'1 205 lbs, BYU

Hall lacks the ideal size that other recent QBs have had that have succeeded early in the NFL; Joe Burrow (6’4, 215), Justin Herbert (6’6, 236), and Josh Allen (6’5, 237).  There will be questions about his overall size and whether he can handle the rigors of the physical nature of the  NFL.  However, Hall can sling the ball around.  He can make all the necessary throws expected of an NFL quarterback and has demonstrated composure in the pocket. Hall could be a quarterback prospect that is disregarded due to size that may end up being a top notch starter for years; in some ways like Russell Wilson (both also played baseball).  For a late, rookie draft flier, I love Jaren Hall’s potential.

- Goody (@JGoody77)

 

4.08 QB Stetson Bennett, 5'11 190 lbs, Georgia 

This 25 year old QB is big game tested. He has the arm strength to make most NFL throws. He’s a confident player who sees the field very well. He especially stands out if a play breaks down with his high football IQ and quick-thinking. With as many injuries at the quarterback position as we’ve seen in the NFL, Bennett could very well be a starting QB by mid-season. To grab him in the 4th round of a Superflex draft could be highway robbery. 

- Bob Miller (@DynastyBobFF)

 

4.09 RB Roschon Johnson, 6’2 223 lbs, Texas

If not for fellow Longhorn Bijan Robinson, Johnson would have been a very productive starter at Texas…or anywhere else in the country for that matter.  In my opinion, Johnson is the most underrated RB in this draft class and is a steal in the 4th round.  

- Tommy Havey (@DynastyProsTom)

 

4.10 RB Mohamed Ibrahim, 5’10”, 210 lbs, Minnesota

Mohamed Ibrahim looked like a star in the making, until opening week of the 2021 season when he tore his achilles tendon in a game against Ohio State. Then, in a near Cam Akers level comeback, he was back and ready to play for the Gophers to open 2022. He doesn’t offer much in the passing game, but to paraphrase Judge Smails in Caddyshack, the world needs two down pounders, too.

- Joel Wirth (@TheJoelWirth)

 

4.11 WR Xavier Hutchinson, 6’3 205 lbs, Iowa State

I was shocked to see Hutchinson was still available this late in our mock draft.  He gives a combination of size and speed that are sure to be coveted.  The knock against him is that he looks like a player who struggles with versatility.  A one trick pony, Hutchinson hasn’t shown he can run a multitude of routes.  That being said, he’s near the top of the class in mid field running, stretching a play and outreaching defenders.  I’m more than happy to select him this late in the draft and the burner potential leaves me more than happy to draft him.

- Tim Lazenby (@mrLazenby_)

 

4.12 WR Andrei Iosivas, 6'3 212 lbs, Princeton

The honor of Mr. Irrelevant for this mock draft goes to Andrei Iosivas out of Princeton. We are once again swinging for the fences in the last round. I am extremely curious to see how he performs at the combine when lined up next to all these other prospects from the big schools. The obvious concern here is his lack of competition at the collegiate level but the athletic profile raises an eyebrow. This is another prospect where perhaps the NFL will shed some light based on how highly he is drafted. Definitely a player I will be paying a lot of attention to during the pre-draft process.

- Doug Harrelson (@DougHarrelson)